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Tracking story changes with NewsBlur

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NewsBlur has been tracking story changes for a long, long time now (first mentioned on the blog five years ago in April 2011). But I felt it was time for an upgrade and today I’m pleased to launch some changes to the story tracker.

If you use a third-party client to read NewsBlur, like Reeder, ReadKit, or Unread, you may have noticed strange revision change highlighters that cross out what gets edited out by a publisher and highlights what gets added.

This is great, except you probably don’t want this turned on for every single story.

By default you will now only see the final edit of the story. And if you are on the web you will see a new Show Story Changes button in the heading of any story that has seen changes.

You can also toggle back and forth between showing and hiding story changes, so you can take a peek behind the curtains and still come back to the read the story in its final, finished form.

This should relieve the burden of having to implement a story change tracker in third-party clients when almost no other news readers have this feature. So third-party reading app makers neglected to include support, leading to a less than ideal NewsBlur reading experience. No longer!

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hashier
2056 days ago
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Is it possible to get an option in settings to "always show revision" so it is visible by default in browser and in other RSS reader clients I can still see revision, I liked it that way.

https://xkcd.com/1172/
Sweden && Norway

LETITSNOW

4 Comments and 12 Shares

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popular
2146 days ago
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srsly
2141 days ago
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He knew what he was doing.
Atlanta, Georgia
theprawn
2146 days ago
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It's the most wonderful time of the year.
sirshannon
2148 days ago
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le tits now!
leiter420
2148 days ago
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SNL
http://youtu.be/jMfqX2mbD7Q

Proposal: keep the nuclear launch codes in an innocent volunteer's chest-cavity

4 Comments and 19 Shares

knife-157254_960_720.png

In 1981, Harvard law professor Roger Fisher, director of the Harvard Negotiation Project, published a thought experiment in the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists: what if the codes to launch nuclear war were kept inside the chest-cavity of a young volunteer, and the President would have to hack them out of this young man's chest before he could commence armageddon? (more…)

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popular
2144 days ago
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BasketballQueen
2139 days ago
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Vendy want to use it?!
Nestie123
2139 days ago
aaa?
pumpkin31
2139 days ago
Ooooo... A nife...
dukeofwulf
2141 days ago
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I like the idea, but it's not exactly an obscure one. Just curious: is there something going on right now that makes this 34-year-old idea relevant again? The nuclear weapon count is now lower than it's been since the 60's. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:US_and_USSR_nuclear_stockpiles.svg
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_states_with_nuclear_weapons
JayM
2142 days ago
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Excellent idea.
Atlanta, GA
satadru
2144 days ago
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'When I suggested this to friends in the Pentagon they said, “My God, that’s terrible. Having to kill someone would distort the President’s judgment. He might never push the button.“'
New York, NY

Choose Firefox Now, Or Later You Won't Get A Choice

8 Comments and 20 Shares

I know it's not the greatest marketing pitch, but it's the truth.

Google is bent on establishing platform domination unlike anything we've ever seen, even from late-1990s Microsoft. Google controls Android, which is winning; Chrome, which is winning; and key Web properties in Search, Youtube, Gmail and Docs, which are all winning. The potential for lock-in is vast and they're already exploiting it, for example by restricting certain Google Docs features (e.g. offline support) to Chrome users, and by writing contracts with Android OEMs forcing them to make Chrome the default browser. Other bad things are happening that I can't even talk about. Individual people and groups want to do the right thing but the corporation routes around them. (E.g. PNaCl and Chromecast avoided Blink's Web standards commitments by declaring themselves not part of Blink.) If Google achieves a state where the Internet is really only accessible through Chrome (or Android apps), that situation will be very difficult to escape from, and it will give Google more power than any company has ever had.

Microsoft and Apple will try to stop Google but even if they were to succeed, their goal is only to replace one victor with another.

So if you want an Internet --- which means, in many ways, a world --- that isn't controlled by Google, you must stop using Chrome now and encourage others to do the same. If you don't, and Google wins, then in years to come you'll wish you had a choice and have only yourself to blame for spurning it now.

Of course, Firefox is the best alternative :-). We have a good browser, and lots of dedicated and brilliant people improving it. Unlike Apple and Microsoft, Mozilla is totally committed to the standards-based Web platform as a long-term strategy against lock-in. And one thing I can say for certain is that of all the contenders, Mozilla is least likely to establish world domination :-).

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popular
2632 days ago
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LonelyBob
2602 days ago
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Good read, some of the reasons why I choose to use Firefox and choose not to use Chrome.
Saitama, Japan
Cafeine
2631 days ago
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Tons of FUD, but I'm using Safari ans FF only. Worth a read.
Paris / France
jhamill
2632 days ago
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"Other bad things are happening that I can't even talk about."

Trust me because, why would I lie?
California
futurile
2621 days ago
@jhamill, I agree the 'trust me there are things I can't tell you' is weak, but in fairness Google does take the other actions. Android OEM's are restricted contractually and through marketing money. It doesn't matter that this is focused on Google, we've got good evidence from the previous 20 years of tech that any one company dominating leads to stagnation and is bad for users.
pdp68
2632 days ago
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Worth a read
Belgium
smilerz
2632 days ago
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What a load of crap.
Chicago or thereabouts
mbrixius
2632 days ago
Yes, its called FUD, For Fear, uncertainty and Doubt. Event though they are right that Google is evil this is just a self centered ploy to make themselves the winner
smilerz
2632 days ago
Microsoft had every advantage and oodles of money - if they couldn't manage to corner the market why would anyone believe that it can be done?
fxer
2631 days ago
Yeah I just think of when IE had 95% market penetration or so and decided to stop innovating. Then Firefox and later Safari and Chrome blew that all apart. You will always have a choice.
marmalade
2632 days ago
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Agree, absolutely. Firefox on my PC (Linux / Windows) and Android devices. If there's a non-Google solution, use it :)
Sussex, UK
hashier
2632 days ago
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worth a read
Sweden && Norway
acdha
2634 days ago
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This is a strong position – unsurprising coming from someone in the thick of the browser at Mozilla – but it's why I made Firefox my default browser about 6 months back.
Washington, DC

Goodbye XP

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MC Escher Inspires a Reptilian Floor

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reptile-floor

A simple room refinishing project lead [Kris] to his biggest hack yet, a floor inspired by MC Escher’s Reptiles printMaurits Cornelis Escher is well known for his reality defying artwork. His lifelong passion was tessellation, large planes covered identical interlocking shapes. Triangles, squares, hexagons all EscherExampleinterlock naturally. Escher discovered that if he cut out part of a shape and replaced it on the opposite side, the new shape will still interlock. In Reptiles, Escher created a lizard shape by modifying a hexagon. One side flipped over to become the nose, 4 others to become the feet, and so on. If the cuts are all made perfectly, the final shape would still interlock.

[Kris] was inspired by a photo of a commercial flooring project using small wooden reptiles as the tiles. He wanted to go with larger wooden tiles for his room. He knew his shapes had to be perfect, so he wrote a computer program to split the hexagon perfectly. Armed with art in DXF format, he went looking for a flooring company to help him. The silence was deafening. Even with artwork ready to go, none of the local custom flooring shops would take his job. Undaunted, [Kris] bought an older CNC machine. The machine was designed to be driven from MS-DOS via the parallel port of a Pentium II era PC. [Kris] substituted an Arduino running GRBL. After some GCode generation, he was cutting tiles.

The real fun started when it was time to glue the tiles down. With all the interlocking parts, it’s impossible to just glue one tile and have it in the perfect position for the next. In [Kris'] own words, “You have to do it all in one go”. Thanks to some family support and muscle, the flooring project was a success.  Great work, [Kris]!


Filed under: home hacks
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popular
2761 days ago
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Dadster
2741 days ago
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I wonder if a trademark troll can be far behind.
New Hampshire
octplane
2757 days ago
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Amazing Idea !
Paris
iaravps
2760 days ago
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Wonderful!
Rio de Janeiro, Brasil
Courtney
2761 days ago
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Holy mother fucking shit
Portland, OR
norb
2761 days ago
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If only I had the talent to do this in my house
clmbs.oh
samuel
2762 days ago
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I love this level of dedication. Even the CNC drill was a risk!
Cambridge, Massachusetts
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